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Most Powerfully moving Movie you've seen?


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Yesterday I watched "Joyeux Noel" after buying it at the store, and it's safe to say that it was definitely worth buying. The setting is in WW1 on the front lines with France and Scottish forces trenched against Germans. I won't go into huge details, but it basically tells a story (based on reality) of how the Allies (France and Scotland) and the Central Powers (mainly the Germans) although at war, would make a ceasefire on Christmas eve and day, and they both toasted together, ate, shared food, sang, and performed mass together. In the end, they just couldn't go back to fighting, as the two sides began to feel this brotherly-hood.

It certainly was a very powerful film, it sparked many emotions in me, and I thoroughly enjoyed watching it. If you haven't watched it yourself, I HIGHLY recommend it.

 

So I ask, what is the most powerful/moving movie you've seen?

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Guest GingerTom

Threads - 1984 BBC production.

 

A low budget TV movie about the aftermath of nuclear war. Scariest thing I've ever seen--and I don't scare easily.

 

Here's some quotes about it:

 

"In this day and age, with all the political tensions between countries, this movie should scare the crap out of anyone who watches it. It's been at least 20yrs since I've seen it, but it made enough of an impression for me to not want to see it again. Don't expect to feel good after watching this one...but if you do watch it, at least you'll have an inkling of what to expect in the event that this type of catastrophe ever occurs."

 

"no matter what age you are or how many times you watch it IT WILL always scare you because its a true account of what could happen and that scares the hell out of us. PURE GENiUS"

 

"I watched this after the recommendations. Watched it in parts mainly because it is so bleak couln't handle it in one go. As someone said above, everyone in a position of power should watch it. There is absolutely no relief and the fact that it is low budget makes it feel even more close to home. It has been on my mind ever since."

 

 

 

 

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I am trying to think of something but I keep drawing a blank, if this were to apply to books there would certainly be a few ranging from poetry to memoirs, and even a bit of fiction.

 

Perhaps I am alone in this but I have always felt sort of detached while watching TV and Movies which could explain why I rarely ever watch either.

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@GingerTom, that sounds very interesting. I have to see if I can watch that somewhere sometime.

 

@GSBModders, I see no problem in sharing a powerful book you've read, feel free to share!

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  • 3 weeks later...

Irreversible. Gruesome, well 2 scenes are

the fire extinguisher + head repeatedly and Monica Belucci getting anally raped and beaten

but terribly compelling because of the way the scenes are shown in reverse. It's not easy for many people to watch but if you can sit through it, it's really rewarding.

 

And umm Forrest Gump lol. That never fails to almost bring me to tears.

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Personally I am a sucked for "help arriving when all hope seems lost"-kind of things, think The Two Towers, when Gandals arrives at the last morning of battle to save the day. I'm a sucker for that.

 

Even more I love "no help arriving and all hope is lost, but fuck that, lets charge anyway"-kind of movies, like Braveheart.:D

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I know that there is an extremer movie, but I forgot it's name and context, cause I hate being depressed by a film. I have to say "Pans Labyrith". That film made me feel bad over and over again, but I still love it.

 

If you haven't seen Pans Labyrinth, you really have to!!! :-D Trust me!!! It's pretty unknown but really a masterpiece.

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Threads - 1984 BBC production.

 

A low budget TV movie about the aftermath of nuclear war. Scariest thing I've ever seen--and I don't scare easily.

 

Here's some quotes about it:

 

"In this day and age' date=' with all the political tensions between countries, this movie should scare the crap out of anyone who watches it. It's been at least 20yrs since I've seen it, but it made enough of an impression for me to not want to see it again. Don't expect to feel good after watching this one...but if you do watch it, at least you'll have an inkling of what to expect in the event that this type of catastrophe ever occurs."

 

"no matter what age you are or how many times you watch it IT WILL always scare you because its a true account of what could happen and that scares the hell out of us. PURE GENiUS"

 

"I watched this after the recommendations. Watched it in parts mainly because it is so bleak couln't handle it in one go. As someone said above, everyone in a position of power should watch it. There is absolutely no relief and the fact that it is low budget makes it feel even more close to home. It has been on my mind ever since."

 

[/quote']

 

Threads is indeed a VERY powerful movie. I don't think anyone can watch it and be unaffected.

 

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All Time. "If". Lindsay Anderson's film.

 

Recently. "Let the right one in" / "Let me in" was certainly the most thought provoking. The book's fairly mediocre, with a grotesque bete du jour theme.

 

The original Swedish film edits and makes a story miles better than the book, but, against the trend, I preferred the American remake.

 

The acting wasn't any better, nor the cinematography, but the direction introduces a few subtle changes that emphasise what it must be like if a strong attachment is made in childhood, and then one friend ages and the other one doesn't. You are painfully aware at the end of the film that history is likely to repeat itself. The horror is gripping enough if you want tension and gore, but the real puller is the relationship between an eternally childlike vampire and her(?) friend who is doomed to grow up. A very dark Peter Pan story.

 

@kapt Ink was a very moving film. I'll have to watch it again, but I have a nagging thought that some overt "christian" propaganda nearly spoiled it for me.

 

@cyanure Rutger Hauer's soliloquy, the death of the little toy-maker, the death of each of the androids. Yep. Moving even today.

 

I once saw someone's sig that was a parody of the "starships aflame in Orion" speech (apologies for poor recall) that ended "..time for tea." I haven't seen it since but I think it was classic.

 

@Loveryus Got to agree that Pan's Labyrinth is disturbingly moving.

He plays with the same timeframe in "The Devil's Backbone"

 

@GingerTom Do you recall Dark Star from the same era as Silent Running?

 

As for a tear jerker. I went to see A Bridge to Terebithia with a young relative and I wasn't the only adult there with watery eyes at one point. There are some things that should always strike home.

 

Other emotions. I came out of Schindler's List in the middle of a seething crowd. Sixty years on from the war 99% of them hadn't even been born then, and probably read the Daily Mail, but if there had been any poor bloody Germans in the street it would have been pitchforks and flaming torches time.

 

 

 

 

 

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Guest GingerTom

@labrat

 

Without looking it up, you're talking about John Carpenter's first film?

 

If so, I thought it was most amusing and interesting at the same time--especially the 'elevator' scene because of the way it was done.

 

My cousin said, 'That looked dangerous'. I laughed at him and rewound the movie.

 

'Look at the scene again, closer,' I told him--finally had to explain it to him (the give-a-way was their hair.)

 

Another movie I remember now: Seven Days In May

 

When I came out of the theatre everybody in the whole crowd was silent, absolutely silent. (It came out during the cold war time.) Saw it a couple of years back and noticed this time how bad the sets were. Didn't matter then--seemed too real back in those days.

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@GingerTom Yep. The elevator scene is classic, (I hadn't noticed but presume it was a 90 degree shot, way before the days of CGI extensions), but for me it's the frozen captain "Talk to the Bomb....", the stargazer and the dude with the bottle organ, oh, and solar/stellar surfing. It's got to be thirty years ago but it sticks in the mind.

 

Just looked on Wiki, and saw that Dan O'Bannon that worked with Carpenter on this went on to write Alien. Learn something every day.

 

Granted, Silent Running was more poignant.

 

You don't see so many intelligent films making it out of the fringes these days it seems.

 

Seven Days in May I haven't seen, but a quick g00gle shows that I should if I get the chance.

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Guest flingingfeces

The Little Mermaid! Don't say you don't love the hell out of some old Disney cartoons. TLM is just one of those flicks that has everything and so much more.

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