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How do I use most of the memory I have?


sharonasbar12

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If you're sick of constant CTDs and are determined to make the game as stable and playable as it can be then the place to start is the STEP project. This involves a fair amount of work and starting with a clean slate. Clearing a weekend for this would be wise.

 

Increasing the amount of memory Skyrim (or any other 32bit application) uses is a whole other story. Not something generally recommended. The simple truth is, if the game is not stable after a rigorous STEP build then something else is wrong and tricking it into using more memory is not going to help.

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Making game use more memory for no reason isn't going to make it more stable, why would it?

 

Probebaly because the lack of memory management is what causing the game to crash to begin with. if it runs out you will simply be kicked out of the game without a warning.

 

Check how smooth fallout 4 is compared to skyrim when i check my memory fallout 4 is using over 12 gig yet skyrim will mostly crash around 3.1 even if you have 16 gig available. Focring the game to use more will illevate the crashes.

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The actual limit of allocated memory for a 32bit application in a 32 bits OS is 3GB.

For a 32bit app on a 64bits OS is 3.7Gb.

 

Some ENB patches uses a trick (that works well only on 64bits OS) to have the graphic memory allocated through a different process, so you can avoid to waste the "game memory" with the DDS memory (but the actual meshes still need to be in the game memory to calculate the physics. Nope Skyrim does not calculate physics with the graphic card.)

 

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The actual limit of allocated memory for a 32bit application in a 32 bits OS is 3GB.

For a 32bit app on a 64bits OS is 3.7Gb.

 

Some ENB patches uses a trick (that works well only on 64bits OS) to have the graphic memory allocated through a different process, so you can avoid to waste the "game memory" with the DDS memory (but the actual meshes still need to be in the game memory to calculate the physics. Nope Skyrim does not calculate physics with the graphic card.)

 

It's not a trick and it's not related to ENB patches - depending on your enblocal.ini settings, memory is stored in the enbhost.exe process.  Each instance of this process can hold up to 10GB of memory.  If one fills up, additional processes are created.  If your enblocal.ini is set up correctly:

 

[MEMORY]

VideoMemorySizeMb=10240

AutodetectVideoMemorySize=false

 

VideoMemorySizeMb should be set at most to (VRAM + RAM - 2048 / max value 10240).  This value is ignored if AudoDetectVideoMemorySize is set to true.

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The actual limit of allocated memory for a 32bit application in a 32 bits OS is 3GB.

For a 32bit app on a 64bits OS is 3.7Gb.

 

Some ENB patches uses a trick (that works well only on 64bits OS) to have the graphic memory allocated through a different process, so you can avoid to waste the "game memory" with the DDS memory (but the actual meshes still need to be in the game memory to calculate the physics. Nope Skyrim does not calculate physics with the graphic card.)

 

It's not a trick and it's not related to ENB patches - depending on your enblocal.ini settings, memory is stored in the enbhost.exe process.  Each instance of this process can hold up to 10GB of memory.  If one fills up, additional processes are created.  If your enblocal.ini is set up correctly.

 

 

 

Actually it IS a trick on 32 bit OSes.

Just delegating the memory allocation to a different process.

 

"Each instance of this process can hold up to 10GB memory"?

Sorry. On a 32 bit OS I am NOT buying it.

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The actual limit of allocated memory for a 32bit application in a 32 bits OS is 3GB.

For a 32bit app on a 64bits OS is 3.7Gb.

 

Some ENB patches uses a trick (that works well only on 64bits OS) to have the graphic memory allocated through a different process, so you can avoid to waste the "game memory" with the DDS memory (but the actual meshes still need to be in the game memory to calculate the physics. Nope Skyrim does not calculate physics with the graphic card.)

 

It's not a trick and it's not related to ENB patches - depending on your enblocal.ini settings, memory is stored in the enbhost.exe process.  Each instance of this process can hold up to 10GB of memory.  If one fills up, additional processes are created.  If your enblocal.ini is set up correctly.

 

 

 

Actually it IS a trick on 32 bit OSes.

Just delegating the memory allocation to a different process.

 

"Each instance of this process can hold up to 10GB memory"?

Sorry. On a 32 bit OS I am NOT buying it.

 

 

I guess 10GB is the "theoretical" limit, but most people seem to be limited to 4GB.  In any case, if more memory is needed, additional processes are generated.  I use Windows 7 64-bit and I don't have 2GB or 3GB limits associated with a 32-bit OS, nor do I have 4GB limits on VRAM accessible to Skyrim via DirectX9 as many have reported.  This limitation is related to newer versions of the OS or drivers.

 

Enbhost.exe will theoretically support up to 128GB of memory (through multiple processes):  http://enbseries.enbdev.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=2787

 

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Single process up to 3.75 Gb on a 32 bits OS: --> OK

Single process more than 3.75 GB on a 32 bits OS: --> it will not happen.

 

Now ENB claims to be able to go beyond the 4 GB limit on 32 OSes. But actually it does not.

Because also on multiple processes (that actually are threads and not real processes) the max memory limit is still 4GB on 32 bits sytems.

 

 

But my real question is: WHY?

Skyrim is running just fine on ULTRA with only 4 GB of memory.

 

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Without knowing your game resolution, it's impossible to draw a comparison.  Larger game resolutions render more pixels:  2560x1440 is 1.78 times as many pixels as 1920x1080, and that puts more strain on video memory for every texture mod that is used.  Increasing uGrids also increases memory load because more of the game world is loaded into memory as does anything that adds geometry to the game world. 

 

Enbhost was not created to make Skyrim look better or to allow people to use more mods - it was created to remove a potential cause for crashing.  It was added for stability.  Not everyone needs it.

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The actual limit of allocated memory for a 32bit application in a 32 bits OS is 3GB.

For a 32bit app on a 64bits OS is 3.7Gb.

 

Some ENB patches uses a trick (that works well only on 64bits OS) to have the graphic memory allocated through a different process, so you can avoid to waste the "game memory" with the DDS memory (but the actual meshes still need to be in the game memory to calculate the physics. Nope Skyrim does not calculate physics with the graphic card.)

 

It's not a trick and it's not related to ENB patches - depending on your enblocal.ini settings, memory is stored in the enbhost.exe process.  Each instance of this process can hold up to 10GB of memory.  If one fills up, additional processes are created.  If your enblocal.ini is set up correctly:

 

[MEMORY]

VideoMemorySizeMb=10240

AutodetectVideoMemorySize=false

 

VideoMemorySizeMb should be set at most to (VRAM + RAM - 2048 / max value 10240).  This value is ignored if AudoDetectVideoMemorySize is set to true.

 

Mine looks like this

[MEMORY]

ExpandSystemMemoryX64=true

ReduceSystemMemoryUsage=true

DisableDriverMemoryManager=false

DisablePreloadToVRAM=false

EnableUnsafeMemoryHacks=false

ReservedMemorySizeMb=512

VideoMemorySizeMb=18432

EnableCompression=false

AutodetectVideoMemorySize=false

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