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I'd like some help with computer cooling stuffs, pls.


Guest marieruth

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Guest marieruth

I've never replaced any computer parts besides PSUs, GPUs, and RAM cards, all of which are pretty simple for the most part for me. I'm going to replace my CPU soon. I'm going to buy this one, and I want it to last a while, so I'm under the assumption CPU cooling helps with that sort of thing. I'm not sure what to look for with heat sinks or CPU cooling products. I don't think my computer tower is big enough to hold a liquid cooling kind of thing, so I'm unsure what I should go with. I also don't know if there are certain compatibility related requirements that I need to look for, either.

 

 

So I ask if any of you who are more familiar with the subject than myself to recommend cooling devices I could use with my computer. Also, I hear of "computer case fans" that should help with cooling as well, so any tips, recommendations, etc. will help out greatly too.

 

 

Also, any brand recommendations for thermal compound and remover would be appreciated too.

 

 

Here are my current system specifications:

CPU: AMD Phenom X4 9750
Mainboard: ASRock A785GM-LE
Memory: 4.00GB Dual-Channel DDR2
Hard Drive: 698GB Seagate ST3750528AS
Video: ATI Radeon HD 4200 (ASRock)
Sound: High Definition Audio Device
CD Rom: TSSTcorp CDDVDW TS-H653R ATA Device
Power Supply: Cooler Master GX-750W
OS: Windows 7 Home Premium 64-Bit SP1
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Be nice to know what the case proportions are like. If you're in the states you mind be able to find people giving away on craiglist or on the curb with plz take signs large ancient cases for free. If required drill a few holes and you got an awesome custom going.

 

Anyway, air fans can help a lot cooling wise (craziest I saw was like 15-20c) or not at all (1-3c). For general setting them up try more fans facing in the 'push air out' direction than the 'push air in' that way you get rid of that hot air.  If you don't know what way the air is going just stick a sheet of paper or something in front of the fan and see what way it goes. You can probably get some old fans on craigslist on the cheap or can buy cheap at some online store.

 

Check the manual on your mobo if it supports more 3/4 pin fans if not just use molex or whatever connector you have on your psu (but not both at the same time unless you like smoking electronics). Make sure to use screws of some kind so the fans don't wobble around, are hitting metal things, and make horrible sounds. Common fan size is 80-90mm or so.

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For picking the right cooler for the job I consult Hardware Secrets, which provides spot-on reviews, especially cooling systems, for those who want performance and economy.

 

Since I use a dual-core Athlon II for all-around usage, I have a Deepcool Mini FS bolted in, but if you have a multi-core processor (Phenom in this case, and if you're aiming for the FX-class of AM3+ processors), of course, larger air coolers are a must.

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Since I use a dual-core Athlon II for all-around usage, I have a Deepcool Mini FS bolted in, but if you have a multi-core processor (Phenom in this case, and if you're aiming for the FX-class of AM3+ processors), of course, larger air coolers are a must.

 

Or liquid cooling. I was frustrated with the various different traditional coolers with my FX-9590. I have it running at 4.7Ghz. I can overclock it to 5.0Ghz, but... I'd like it to live, thanks. Running at idle the core temp was 37-40C. Running with a heavy gaming load core temp was 65-72C, which is not pretty. The case I had supposedly was capable of taking the liquid CPU cooler I got, but that wasn't going to happen. It took about two seconds to see there was NO way. So I had to get a new case. Poor me. It's way cooler than my old one. Got the liquid CPU cooler installed and now... running at idle core temp is 25-28C. Running a heavy gaming load core temp is now 33-38C. I'm really happy. And the beauty of it all is that the fans on the liquid CPU cooler I have are significantly quieter than the ones on my traditional case filling heatsink/fan assembly.

 

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Guest marieruth

Be nice to know what the case proportions are like. If you're in the states you mind be able to find people giving away on craiglist or on the curb with plz take signs large ancient cases for free. If required drill a few holes and you got an awesome custom going.

 

Anyway, air fans can help a lot cooling wise (craziest I saw was like 15-20c) or not at all (1-3c). For general setting them up try more fans facing in the 'push air out' direction than the 'push air in' that way you get rid of that hot air.  If you don't know what way the air is going just stick a sheet of paper or something in front of the fan and see what way it goes. You can probably get some old fans on craigslist on the cheap or can buy cheap at some online store.

 

Check the manual on your mobo if it supports more 3/4 pin fans if not just use molex or whatever connector you have on your psu (but not both at the same time unless you like smoking electronics). Make sure to use screws of some kind so the fans don't wobble around, are hitting metal things, and make horrible sounds. Common fan size is 80-90mm or so.

 

My computer was originally prebuilt (p6130f) and this is the dimensions of the case:

 

ce2QYv4.png

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Guest marieruth

For picking the right cooler for the job I consult Hardware Secrets, which provides spot-on reviews, especially cooling systems, for those who want performance and economy.

 

Since I use a dual-core Athlon II for all-around usage, I have a Deepcool Mini FS bolted in, but if you have a multi-core processor (Phenom in this case, and if you're aiming for the FX-class of AM3+ processors), of course, larger air coolers are a must.

 

I couldn't seem to find any listings for my current mobo on Hardware Secrets, unfortunately. My mobo's compatible CPU list has a bunch of Athlon CPUs. I was thinking of trying Athlon II instead of doing another Phenom II. Though I don't know if it would make a difference. My mobo doesn't support AM3+, but it does support AM2, AM2+. and AM3. CPU Support List

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Since you are using a HP case I am assuming you are not into heavy overclock or super quiet built.  I haven't used AMD CPU in a while but Intel retail CPU comes with thermal compound and cooling unit so no after market add-ons are necessary (I assume AMD has the same policy).  Intel stock cooling unit is actually very well built.  It's not designed for performance but Intel engineering standard is usually the highest in the industry so it will last.  I imagine AMD stock should be pretty decent as well.

 

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Guest marieruth

Since you are using a HP case I am assuming you are not into heavy overclock or super quiet built.  I haven't used AMD CPU in a while but Intel retail CPU comes with thermal compound and cooling unit so no after market add-ons are necessary (I assume AMD has the same policy).  Intel stock cooling unit is actually very well built.  It's not designed for performance but Intel engineering standard is usually the highest in the industry so it will last.  I imagine AMD stock should be pretty decent as well.

 

I knew very little when I originally bought this computer 8 years ago. This computer is prebuilt as I mentioned in an earlier post. I don't care about overclocking stuff, but if there's a way to help reduce sound, then I'm all ears for recommendations with that, as well. My computer didn't come with thermal compound when first bought, it came with a mouse, keyboard, and a cable for wireless. I bought it from Fry's Electronics. Are you saying I should go for Intel fans or stick to what I have? Your post is bouncing between AMD and Intel and I can't tell what you are trying to tell me. Sorry.

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silentpcreview.com - this is the go to site for people looking to dampen PC noise.  

 

Your original post said you are going to upgrade the CPU so I am assuming you are buying retail CPU.  Retail CPU comes in individual box and includes thermal compound and cooling unit.  You don't need to buy anything else to install the CPU.  Branded PC companies get their CPU in bulk and those don't come with thermal compound and cooling unit.  PC companies source those separately.  Most people cannot buy OEM CPU.  If someone is selling you one be careful because Intel/AMD don't honor consumer warranty on bulk CPU.

 

I don't have a view between AMD vs. Intel CPU and I haven't used AMD CPU in a long time. 

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Looking at the link to the Phenom on sale, I had a friend who also had that type of processor, and so in his case he also bolted in a Coolermaster V8. However, the problem with those Phenoms was their massive power consumption (as seen in this comparison between the Phenom II X4 965 and the FX 6300, which asked for only 95w), but he later jumped over to a Haswell i5 and a new motherboard.

 

Well, I think for now if I were in your shoes and that the current processor is still working well, I would have to save up for an FX processor, a new motherboard and faster DDR3 memory, plus a better cooler and case.

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