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HDT Collisions: What else is there then breasts?


Puupsfred

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Wherever I look around, all I see is threads and resources to get this goddam idle animation to work with HDT:

 

index.php?app=core&module=attach&section

http://www.loverslab.com/topic/24339-sexy-idle-animation-by-red31133dm/?p=610641

 

WHAT ELSE IS THERE??

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

to be fair, I came across some other projects, working on collision support for vaginas, hair and belly/dicks.

http://www.loverslab.com/files/file/803-realistic-vagina-for-cbbe/

http://www.loverslab.com/topic/27122-hdt-collisions-hair-physics-now-with-belly-support-updated-just-another-hdt-xml-file/

http://www.loverslab.com/topic/26891-how-to-enable-hdt-belly-distortions-with-sos/?p=675584

 

But is this everything there is so far? Does a HDT enabled body not support collisions with its on body parts? Why not?

Can I get some plugin to enable collision for player+npc or npc+npc or player/npc+object collisions?

Pls provide some links if you can, thx.

 

 

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It would be hard to do full body interactions (like hands deform thighs etc...)

 

There's technical limits like can only skin 4 bones per vertex.

 

The Havok free SDK is limited and only provides basic optimization and features for super basic rigid body collisions (and not true soft body physics) etc...

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You obviously haven't looked hard enough.  I had the same question months ago but since several authors have explained how collision works with HDT PE in their threads.  For me this one is the best; clear, concise and easy to understand.  We all wish mods are like magic that can make dreams come alive but then science decides to butt in.

 

So here it is copy and paste:

 

>>

Posted by jacques00 on 22 May 2014 - 12:36 AM in HDT Physics Extension

Outside of hand-made (joint-based and morph-based) and motion-captured animation, physics-dependant animation falls into three major forms (at least in the real-time systems department).

 

One is rigid-body physics, which include things like falling boxes, jiggling bones, etc. This is the most simple out of the three because it's a per-object basis when it comes to calculation. Of course, it can be built to become more complex, but generally it is used because it doesn't kill in calculation time, depending on the CPU/GPU that's doing the calculations. Most game engines tend to use this kind of physics animation because of this. HDT_PE is currently using this kind of physics-based animation technique, applying it to the bones of a skeleton which in turn affect the vertices of a mesh the bones are weighted to, creating the illusion of jiggly bits.

 

The second is soft-body physics, which include things like cloth and other similar deformable objects. This is a step up from rigid body since, like rigid body dynamics, imagine that each vertex is a bone and all those bones are affected by physics--not only that, but the bones have to still conform to a shape after being affected. So instead of being one object affected by physics, the vertices of that object/mesh is being affected. The more vertices you have the more computation has to be done. You can see why this is not ideal for game engines unless there is powerful enough hardware to support it. The best part about per-vertex physics would be that it would be easier to make the mesh not clip on "solid" objects (after defining the collision boundaries, of course). This is one of the things HDT_PE is trying to achieve, but hasn't yet gotten there. I know that the Havok engine should support soft-body physics, but I am unsure if Skyrim's engine allows for it. So far it seems that if you want cloth-like physics without the inter-penetrations and are under the limitations of rigid-body dynamics, you must use a lot of bones, skin weight your meshes very well, and generously apply collision information.

 

The third is fluid-based physics, which create deformations like water and other liquids. This kind of physics makes the object conform to the shape of it's container rather than to it's own shape. Normally, fluid dynamics affect particles which are calculated to form an overall shape for each interval in time, and each time a new mesh is automatically built to conform to that shape. You can imagine how calculation intensive this is and how (at least at this point) it is not ideal for a real-time system to have--especially if you have an old CPU/GPU. Pile on collisions, shaders/materials/textures, and other interactions and Skyrim might explode after one cell load. I don't think this is a possibility in Havok's physics engine, so ultimately this might not be the aim of HDT_PE, but it's something interesting nonetheless.

 

So at this point, we are currently looking at rigid-body physics until we can sort out how to access soft-body dynamics.

>>

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You obviously haven't looked hard enough.  I had the same question months ago but since several authors have explained how collision works with HDT PE in their threads.  For me this one is the best; clear, concise and easy to understand.  We all wish mods are like magic that can make dreams come alive but then science decides to butt in.

 

So here it is copy and paste:

 

>>

Posted by jacques00 on 22 May 2014 - 12:36 AM in HDT Physics Extension

Outside of hand-made (joint-based and morph-based) and motion-captured animation, physics-dependant animation falls into three major forms (at least in the real-time systems department).

 

One is rigid-body physics, which include things like falling boxes, jiggling bones, etc. This is the most simple out of the three because it's a per-object basis when it comes to calculation. Of course, it can be built to become more complex, but generally it is used because it doesn't kill in calculation time, depending on the CPU/GPU that's doing the calculations. Most game engines tend to use this kind of physics animation because of this. HDT_PE is currently using this kind of physics-based animation technique, applying it to the bones of a skeleton which in turn affect the vertices of a mesh the bones are weighted to, creating the illusion of jiggly bits.

 

The second is soft-body physics, which include things like cloth and other similar deformable objects. This is a step up from rigid body since, like rigid body dynamics, imagine that each vertex is a bone and all those bones are affected by physics--not only that, but the bones have to still conform to a shape after being affected. So instead of being one object affected by physics, the vertices of that object/mesh is being affected. The more vertices you have the more computation has to be done. You can see why this is not ideal for game engines unless there is powerful enough hardware to support it. The best part about per-vertex physics would be that it would be easier to make the mesh not clip on "solid" objects (after defining the collision boundaries, of course). This is one of the things HDT_PE is trying to achieve, but hasn't yet gotten there. I know that the Havok engine should support soft-body physics, but I am unsure if Skyrim's engine allows for it. So far it seems that if you want cloth-like physics without the inter-penetrations and are under the limitations of rigid-body dynamics, you must use a lot of bones, skin weight your meshes very well, and generously apply collision information.

 

The third is fluid-based physics, which create deformations like water and other liquids. This kind of physics makes the object conform to the shape of it's container rather than to it's own shape. Normally, fluid dynamics affect particles which are calculated to form an overall shape for each interval in time, and each time a new mesh is automatically built to conform to that shape. You can imagine how calculation intensive this is and how (at least at this point) it is not ideal for a real-time system to have--especially if you have an old CPU/GPU. Pile on collisions, shaders/materials/textures, and other interactions and Skyrim might explode after one cell load. I don't think this is a possibility in Havok's physics engine, so ultimately this might not be the aim of HDT_PE, but it's something interesting nonetheless.

 

So at this point, we are currently looking at rigid-body physics until we can sort out how to access soft-body dynamics.

>>

 

 

thx for the quote

 

So what else than own hand/breast-, vagina-, own hair- and belly/dicks collision is there atm?

What is coming up next and how long, before we can reasonably expect the first mods for soft body dynamics?

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When:

 

A. A modding god descends upon us and takes the time to make a good port of Physx into skyrim via SKSE plugin

 

B. A millionaire tycoon who owns a game company buys a full Havok licence and then subsequently leaks the API and Art toolkit out into the world without fear of reperations or lawsuits.

 

C. When bethesda releases their next game without shitty Havok.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have a bit of a problem with bolt quivers sinking into the ass, just there is an example of a collision problem. Came to think about it, flute playing. Would it not be nice if they moved the flute all the way up to the mouth? Is this something that could be done with collision or simply an animation issue?

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I have a bit of a problem with bolt quivers sinking into the ass, just there is an example of a collision problem. Came to think about it, flute playing. Would it not be nice if they moved the flute all the way up to the mouth? Is this something that could be done with collision or simply an animation issue?

 

Flute thing is an animation/model issue

 

The physics bolt quivers thing can be fixed via hdt though (if your using the hdt equipment mod and allow physics controlled movement)

Otherwise it's another animation/model issue.

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