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13 minutes ago, FauxFurry said:

I'm wondering why so many humans build their houses from wood and plant by-products but make their disposable food receptacles out of plastics, metals and glass.

Wouldn't it be more sensible to have food containers be biodegradable while their biggest investments would be built to last?

Ever been inside a plastic container in the heat? 

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1 hour ago, Alkpaz said:

Ever been inside a plastic container in the heat? 

Have you ever been inside of burning pile of wood and leaves? It would be bound to be far less pleasant.

Climate control and insulation would take care of the effects of the environmental effects of heat and cold as it does with homes made of any materials. 

Stone homes are downright cozy when properly carpeted and air conditioned.

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52 minutes ago, FauxFurry said:

Have you ever been inside of burning pile of wood and leaves? It would be bound to be far less pleasant.

Climate control and insulation would take care of the effects of the environmental effects of heat and cold as it does with homes made of any materials. 

Stone homes are downright cozy when properly carpeted and air conditioned.

LoL, That is true, but wood takes time to heat up to the point of being burning hot, plastic tends to heat up quicker, and thus not very good for insulation or trying to keep a household cool during the summer months. Oh stone homes are probably the best, they keep your home cooler than a wooden built one. ;) I don't know if steel is a good insulator, but most office buildings have steel supports and don't seem to use more or less energy than wood or stone. 

 

"This plastic's melting point is 170 degrees Celsius (338 degrees Fahrenheit)" 

 

"Most types of wood will start combusting at about 300 degrees Celsius. The gases burn and increase the temperature of the wood to about 600 degrees Celsius (1,112 degrees Fahrenheit)."

 

"All the Silicates are molten at about 1200°C and all are solid when cooled to about 600°C."

 

"Steel often melts at around 1370 degrees C (2500°F)." (Twin Towers)

 

Seems like I would choose wood over plastic to prevent it melting and having the house collapse on me. At least, it gives me a little more time to get out. 

 

I looked up fiber glass: " They retain approximately 50% of room temperature tensile strength at 700°F (371°C); approximately 25% at 900°F (482°C); with a softening point of 1555°F (846°C) and amelting point of 2075° F (1121 °C)."

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8 minutes ago, Alkpaz said:

 I don't know if steel is a good insulator, but most office buildings have steel supports and don't seem to use more or less energy than wood or stone. 

Stand in an all metal shed at upper 80° weather outside... steel has poor insulation.

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The wooden trash-can would fester with bacteria, unless you coated it with some petro-chemical product.

Uhm, fibre-board or recycled wood would disintegrate.

Some things shouldn't be biodegradable.

Steel must be leeching the earth of precious resources, so

they make commercials about anthropomorphic plastic bottles wishing they could eventually be

a trash can or some plastic bench.

  That commercial and the dog who takes up smoking-commercial (don't throw away butts) are stupid.

I think you all started talking about something else, so that is also on my mind, please continue.

But if we wanted really cool houses we'd invent flame-retardant plastic that didn't give off fumes, and use it for roofing and walls.

There's a cement church close by, a monument to concrete ugliness.

If it were plastic (just daydreaming) it could be brightly colored, shiny and bulletproof.

 

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15 minutes ago, GimmeBACON said:

Stand in an all metal shed at upper 80° weather outside... steel has poor insulation.

The question would be, which would heat up faster, steel or plastic? 

 

Edit: "Plastics will typically have a much lower coefficient of thermal conductivity, meaning that they are better thermal insulators than metals, which are better thermal conductors. ... This is due to the fact that a higher thermal conductivity will allow the metal rod to heat up faster."

 

Guess that answers that. 

 

Although plastic vs wood, plastic heats up faster than wood: "Wood 0.04 - 0.4
Plastic 0.17-0.4"

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Just now, Alkpaz said:

The question would be, which would heat up faster, steel or plastic? 

Plastic heats and cools at a much lower temperature... but think about it, plastic warps in the sun and breaks when it gets to cold, plastic isn't good for long term. 

 

Regardless, steel by itself has no natural insulation and would absorb heat and cold.

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3 hours ago, FauxFurry said:

I'm wondering why so many humans build their houses from wood and plant by-products but make their disposable food receptacles out of plastics, metals and glass.

Wouldn't it be more sensible to have food containers be biodegradable while their biggest investments would be built to last?

Trash cans and stuff are made out of plastic and metal because you need to keep things out of your bins and you need them to withstand the elements. Plastics and metals that aren't iron are waterproof and really good at locking in odors, whereas wood – even if coated – gets soaked and rots and is less effective at keeping in scents. It's really important that your trash isn't exposed to the elements because 1) it keeps it neatly in one place instead of it flying all over the place, 2) wet garbage smells like death, and 3) it prevents your home from being "visited" by vermin (flies, maggots, rats, stray cats, raccoons, opossums, goddamn bears, etc.). It may sound silly, but you really don't want to be cheap when it comes to your garbage cans. Durable plastic > biodegradable material. Now, if you were talking about garbage bags being biodegradable, then I might agree with you.

As for houses being made of wood, eh I'd say that depends a lot on where you live. In the U.S. (where I live), a lot of homes are made of wood frames, plaster, and thick cardboard. The reason why so many homes here are made of wood instead of bricks or concrete is because of a different reasons:

  1. Using wood is cheaper than using bricks, especially due to labor costs related to masonry. Since it's a cheaper material, it costs less to build a home made of wood and the resulting home is less expensive than a brick house would've been. In a country with over 300 million people living in it, affordable housing is kind of a big deal. You can't really mass produce brick houses, at least not as efficiently.
  2. North America has a lot of trees. Not only that, but we have trees that are as tall as skyscrapers (e.g. coast redwoods and western hemlock trees), and you can buy really high quality wood (e.g. oak, cherry, maple) for a very low price. Plus, carpenters work faster and cheaper than masons do.
  3. It's easier to renovate a home made of wood than a home made of brick. This is mainly due to how easy it is to break plaster. There are certain walls in my home that I can punch a hole through and be completely unharmed, but I'd break my hand if I punched a brick wall. Less durable walls make things like adding new plumbing additions and electrical systems a lot easier. 
  4. Home owners who live in areas known for being struck by natural disasters are fully aware of the risks and have insurance in case shit hits the fan. I know this because the cities neighboring the one I live in are known hot spots for brush fires; as in, we can predict what time of year the hills will burst into flames. Thanks, low humidity, relentless heat waves, and high winds! It still sucks if a neighborhood burns down, but they're at least covered and it's relatively easy for a construction team to rebuild. It's not exactly ideal, but that's where we're at.

Now, while I do agree that a brick house would be more durable and last longer than a wooden one, I and I think most other Americans would pick the cheaper option. Actually, I wouldn't even buy a house because of how exorbitant the price of houses are in my state. $400,000+ for a small, single-story home in a safe neighborhood? No thanks, I'd rather live in my car lol.

Side note: I found an interesting article about low-cost homes made of reused plastic in Colombia to aid the housing crisis. They're not exactly the most attractive homes to look at, but it is an intriguing development, I'd say.

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7 hours ago, FauxFurry said:

I'm wondering why so many humans build their houses from wood and plant by-products but make their disposable food receptacles out of plastics, metals and glass.

Wouldn't it be more sensible to have food containers be biodegradable while their biggest investments would be built to last?

Capitalism, dumbass

 

OK, Ok,

 

Long term sustainability of existing business models. If nothing ever rots away, who needs repairmen?

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10 hours ago, porkybork said:

Trash cans and stuff are made out of plastic and metal because you need to keep things out of your bins and you need them to withstand the elements. Plastics and metals that aren't iron are waterproof and really good at locking in odors, whereas wood – even if coated – gets soaked and rots and is less effective at keeping in scents. It's really important that your trash isn't exposed to the elements because 1) it keeps it neatly in one place instead of it flying all over the place, 2) wet garbage smells like death, and 3) it prevents your home from being "visited" by vermin (flies, maggots, rats, stray cats, raccoons, opossums, goddamn bears, etc.). It may sound silly, but you really don't want to be cheap when it comes to your garbage cans. Durable plastic > biodegradable material. Now, if you were talking about garbage bags being biodegradable, then I might agree with you.

As for houses being made of wood, eh I'd say that depends a lot on where you live. In the U.S. (where I live), a lot of homes are made of wood frames, plaster, and thick cardboard. The reason why so many homes here are made of wood instead of bricks or concrete is because of a different reasons:

  1. Using wood is cheaper than using bricks, especially due to labor costs related to masonry. Since it's a cheaper material, it costs less to build a home made of wood and the resulting home is less expensive than a brick house would've been. In a country with over 300 million people living in it, affordable housing is kind of a big deal. You can't really mass produce brick houses, at least not as efficiently.
  2. North America has a lot of trees. Not only that, but we have trees that are as tall as skyscrapers (e.g. coast redwoods and western hemlock trees), and you can buy really high quality wood (e.g. oak, cherry, maple) for a very low price. Plus, carpenters work faster and cheaper than masons do.
  3. It's easier to renovate a home made of wood than a home made of brick. This is mainly due to how easy it is to break plaster. There are certain walls in my home that I can punch a hole through and be completely unharmed, but I'd break my hand if I punched a brick wall. Less durable walls make things like adding new plumbing additions and electrical systems a lot easier. 
  4. Home owners who live in areas known for being struck by natural disasters are fully aware of the risks and have insurance in case shit hits the fan. I know this because the cities neighboring the one I live in are known hot spots for brush fires; as in, we can predict what time of year the hills will burst into flames. Thanks, low humidity, relentless heat waves, and high winds! It still sucks if a neighborhood burns down, but they're at least covered and it's relatively easy for a construction team to rebuild. It's not exactly ideal, but that's where we're at.

Now, while I do agree that a brick house would be more durable and last longer than a wooden one, I and I think most other Americans would pick the cheaper option. Actually, I wouldn't even buy a house because of how exorbitant the price of houses are in my state. $400,000+ for a small, single-story home in a safe neighborhood? No thanks, I'd rather live in my car lol.

Side note: I found an interesting article about low-cost homes made of reused plastic in Colombia to aid the housing crisis. They're not exactly the most attractive homes to look at, but it is an intriguing development, I'd say.

I wasn't saying that trash bins should be biodegradable, I was idly wondering why that bottles and can and the like should more often be made of biodegradable substances.

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8 hours ago, Pork Type said:

Capitalism, dumbass

 

OK, Ok,

 

Long term sustainability of existing business models. If nothing ever rots away, who needs repairmen?

Sadly, that was the most obvious answer, not that I let it get in the way of my line of questioning. It always comes down to that, much as the reason why 'They don't build them like that anymore" is Planned Obsolescence.

 

If one let simple other people's business models answer all of our questions about business decisions, then all of our conversations would be very short. Why did they take that feature out of the sequel? It is cheaper to bug-fix a game with less features than it is to put in features that most players won't use anyway. Why add in micro-transactions into a single player game? Why would the publisher let other companies milk their whales dry first? So on and so forth.

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5 hours ago, FauxFurry said:

Sadly, that was the most obvious answer, not that I let it get in the way of my line of questioning. It always comes down to that, much as the reason why 'They don't build them like that anymore" is Planned Obsolescence.

 

If one let simple other people's business models answer all of our questions about business decisions, then all of our conversations would be very short. Why did they take that feature out of the sequel? It is cheaper to bug-fix a game with less features than it is to put in features that most players won't use anyway. Why add in micro-transactions into a single player game? Why would the publisher let other companies milk their whales dry first? So on and so forth.

And you are a bit too late.  Meet ......the idea man:

 

Spoiler

 

 

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On 4/23/2019 at 8:07 PM, FauxFurry said:

I'm wondering why so many humans build their houses from wood and plant by-products but make their disposable food receptacles out of plastics, metals and glass.

Wouldn't it be more sensible to have food containers be biodegradable while their biggest investments would be built to last?

yes,

However, people don't seem to do this anymore

https://www.popularmechanics.com/technology/infrastructure/g2606/most-impressive-ancient-builds/

 

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