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KoolHndLuke

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9 hours ago, RitualClarity said:

All my hardware would turn on and work. Often times however, they had more bells and whisles and other crap added on to it that I didn't want or need

RGB Lighting- I don't give a rat's ass about how pretty my pc looks, it could look like a pile of shit for all I care as long as it maxes the latest games at least 1440p at 144 Hz. I don't buy things like computer components because they're designed to light up like x-mas trees. I buy them for their functionality and hopefully reliability if I'm spending the extra bucks. All my not-so-cheap parts came from China(!!!) and I've got a $1000 brick sitting in my bedroom now, so even spending the extra money doesn't seem to help ensure better quality anymore.

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On 11/23/2019 at 11:56 PM, KoolHndLuke said:

I was going to go with at least three new sata drives and use raid 5 controller card maybe. I'd love to have ssd instead, but not sure it's worth the extra money.

I didn't see it mentioned before. It is 1000% worth the extra money for SSD (and presumably M.2 I haven't made that jump yet myself). In terms of doing regular things on the computer, new HD technology probably makes a more apparent difference than any other component.

 

Why are you looking to use RAID? Unless you are making a server that needs to deliver content to other users there isn't much point. Use backblaze.com to back up whatever you need to. Costs a few dollars per month for relatively large amounts of data. Let them build and pay the power bill on the RAID for you.

On 11/24/2019 at 3:22 PM, KoolHndLuke said:

The case

Many people skimp on the case. I used to. But, it's actually the component that will most likely outlast every other part. A good one makes a build so much more enjoyable and easy.

 

I like these: https://www.fractal-design.com/

7 hours ago, KoolHndLuke said:

Is this really as big a deal as people make out?

 

 

I've been building computers for 20 years. Have never bothered with this and have never had a problem from it.

 

In all that time I only have two stories about power-related damage:

A) Sold a computer to a friend. His brother decided to try to clean out the dust build-up inside with a vacuum cleaner. Something about the vacuum touching the parts (static?) caused something to break. Never started again.

 

B) Something fell off my desk once and landed right on the surge protector power switch, knocking power out. The resulting power-jolt broke a hard drive.

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11 hours ago, KoolHndLuke said:

Is this really as big a deal as people make out?

 

 

I haven't seen a computer die from being touched like the above. usually it is something that will show strange effects over time. Also, never had a problem if the computer was running. The issue I experienced and concerned with was raw sensitive parts like memory (the bottom connection part) being touched. If you miss handle the electronics .. you can give it a small charge. If that charge is large enough it can cause some hidden damage that may or may  not cause you trouble later down the road. Generally, it is stupid easy to prevent this. Matt usage, touching the case a few seconds before you touch sensitive components inside the computer, etc. There is also the ol' favorite of the wrist strap. All will help make sure you don't accidentally do something you will later have to fix. Generally if you work on computers long enough and / or build them (many) you will start to develop the habits (hopefully) that will help prevent this from hapening. I am sure your research and school/class is letting you know how serious this is. .. but.. hopefully how stupid easy it is to avoid and prevent. ;)

3 hours ago, dagobaking said:

 

I didn't see it mentioned before. It is 1000% worth the extra money for SSD (and presumably M.2 I haven't made that jump yet myself). In terms of doing regular things on the computer, new HD technology probably makes a more apparent difference than any other component.

 

Why are you looking to use RAID? Unless you are making a server that needs to deliver content to other users there isn't much point. Use backblaze.com to back up whatever you need to. Costs a few dollars per month for relatively large amounts of data. Let them build and pay the power bill on the RAID for you.

Many people skimp on the case. I used to. But, it's actually the component that will most likely outlast every other part. A good one makes a build so much more enjoyable and easy.

 

I like these: https://www.fractal-design.com/

I've been building computers for 20 years. Have never bothered with this and have never had a problem from it.

 

In all that time I only have two stories about power-related damage:

A) Sold a computer to a friend. His brother decided to try to clean out the dust build-up inside with a vacuum cleaner. Something about the vacuum touching the parts (static?) caused something to break. Never started again.

 

B) Something fell off my desk once and landed right on the surge protector power switch, knocking power out. The resulting power-jolt broke a hard drive.

M.2s if you can get them.. really nice and fast. If you can't there are cheap 2.5s now that are getting larger and larger every year. I have seen 1tb for less than a C note. Not the best but does the job. So far even the generic Microcenter ones have been solid for me. I have an old sata 2 version from like 9 years ago and still works. In my experience if you are careful, you can get some pretty solid time out of them. Haven't used a M.2 myself yet.

 

I agree with @dagobaking on the raid.  The reasons for using it are two.. speed (for raid zero) and redundancy.  Most home setups don't require the redundancy and for the speed... not advised as if anything goes wrong.. you are literally fucked. Windows likes fucking up.. so not advised there.  If for some reason you wanted to set up a Plex server and make sure it was able to serve 10 people constantly even if there was a drive failure.. then that might.. notice.. might be a reason.  However, you'd likely be using the motherboard raid controller and not all are created equal. Often that is an item that WILL fail prematurely on motherboard as the raid controller is beat 24/7.  (referring to standard commercial computer mobo.. server and/or workstation boards are a different story)  In the above Plex server situation. you can easily just have a hard drive ready to go into the machine if a drive died. A few minutes later...you are ready to move moves from your backup. Even quicker if you have an updated drive externally with the movies cloned from that drive (while it was still good) and kept up to date ready to go. you can use a dock to sync. There are many software that can do this or you can create a simple robocopy script (or similar) and call it a day. One or two good docs, two large drives in the rig for movies... and a screwdriver and quick access computer case.. and you are golden.

 

Computer cases need to be considered more than most people do. chances are if you have a problem with your build and you are a noob, it is due to having a case that isn't designed properly for YOUR NEEDS. Just like the rest of the build.. you don't want to skimp on the case. You need a case that is appropriate for your build, with reasonable quality and design for your goals in your build while providing adequate ventilation for all the components you will get today and any possible ones for the future. I know so many that either over buy (not a bad thing in this case as I agree with @dagobaking that the case will likely outlast the other components only getting outdated with new USB ports etc. ) but often underbuying, saving money on the case so that they can get something else or spend more on something else. this leaves them compromised and in need of an upgrade. This means they have to disassemble. Que Johnny 5 "no disassemble". This risk that something can go wrong in the process.

 

The best thing is to think out the ENTIRE build including the case and any upgrades options like M.2s into the build. if upgrading.. consider all the parts. It takes a bit of effort but there are forums and support for such things. Better to be an informed consumer than to waste time and money.

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On 2/14/2020 at 10:27 AM, 2dk2c.2 said:

Capture.JPG.cfc5bc6d9dd036b26b9dd2d0d6f1c768.JPG

I am retarded at math but people read computer history and apply linear regression to how much memory you should have.

 

You used to need 4 then it had to be 8, now it's sixteen or you're in the middle-ages, and (I guess) now they're saying, 32.

I bet someone could prove that 4 is still enough, but people don't go that way, they'd rather buy freezers for their overclocked hamster of a CPU.

"Do more with less" is nobody's motto.

Least of all (for example) windows 10 and maybe 3dmark.

Although windows with all its services and bloatware still says I use less than 4 playing a single game.

But I guess a bit-mining server whose clients watch movies might need 8

You run your computer as you would using the heaviest programs and usage case. Pull up the task manager.. if you are showing good on the memory.. then you are good. Doesn't matter if you are using 1, 2, 4, 8, 16 or even 32.  This is a way to double check to be sure you have everything in order. Same can be said for processors and such.

Spoiler

Annotation 2020-02-25 090110.png

 

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4 hours ago, RitualClarity said:

The reasons for using it are two.. speed (for raid zero) and redundancy.  Most home setups don't require the redundancy and for the speed... not advised as if anything goes wrong.. you are literally fucked.

Yep. Regarding speed, if you have the money for multiple drives you might as well spend it on a much faster M.2 on a home machine.

 

A server is just a different, separate kind of a project from a gaming machine. It's better served with different hardware (server motherboards like from SuperMicro), different cases, no graphics card needed and different software (FreeBSD, Ubuntu, etc).

4 hours ago, RitualClarity said:

I know so many that either over buy

Full glass side-panels are kind of nice though. :D

 

I would recommend against getting an LED-version of a case (ones with a bunch of lit up fans, etc.). Unless that is really, really your thing. The extra cabling for that (if they include LED controllers, etc.) is a huge pain to work around.

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m.2 is good, but it's a bitch to setup the bios so you can install/run a OS on them.

other problems are they can run a bit hot (my m.2 is 41c, where as my sata is only 25c), and if your computer dies or can't be used for some reason then you will need to get a adapter to get any files off of it (because chances are you don't have another computer around with a m.2 slot.)

 

 

glass side/front panels are like putting a plastic bag over your head, you may be able to see through it but you sure a fuck can't breath.

also: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FqnCHa9qlxM

 

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11 hours ago, dagobaking said:

Many people skimp on the case. I used to. But, it's actually the component that will most likely outlast every other part. A good one makes a build so much more enjoyable and easy.

 

I like these: https://www.fractal-design.com/

This so much.

Bought a Fractal Design Define R5 three years ago, which cost about 105€ back then.

Quietest tower I ever had.

Also fantastic cable placement, lots of room for SSDs and other hard drives.

Basically the most modular tower I ever had.

 

I did the mistake and bought an AIO water cooler. Turned out that thing was not equipped to stop the CPU from overheating with even very minor overclocking.

But it fit inside the case.

Then I replaced it with the biggest Noctua fan I could find (NH D15), which did also fit.

Since then temps rarely rise above 60°C with OCCT running a CPU stress test, and even with Prime95 (which while being much older still seems to be the ultimate stress test tool) I stay well below 70°C after an half hour test cycle.

Normal temps are much lower of course, these tests only simulate worst case scenarios with Prime95 probably being somewhat unrealistic because of its very specific calculations.

And this whole tower makes next to zero noise even when running on all cylinders.

 

Since then I shuffled around a few hard drives and replaced a graphics card and it's pure bliss with this case, everything is easy to reach and easy to install.

So I'll never again skimp on cases either.

 

MoBos on the other hand I buy cheap, never had issues. Anecdotal evidence, I know, but this far it worked out.

I only wished they wouldn't be outdated so quickly, especially because of newer CPU generations. And of course I still don't buy total no name brands.

 

Basically the only things I don't skimp on besides the tower itself are the graphics card and the PSU.

And recently a somewhat large SSD for my Steam and GOG libraries, but there the brand doesn't really matter.

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6 hours ago, Bazinga said:

I did the mistake and bought an AIO water cooler.

Yeah. I feel like water cooling is a gimmick. It's definitely not a quieter solution.

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