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KoolHndLuke

What do You do for a Living?

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That one question has sparked off some hours long dialogue (monologue) at times. Probably because people like to talk about what they do for a living. With this I'll add in that it is also of interest to me that you are all perverted gamers as well- like me! I'm not asking for any personal info here at all. Just what you would like to tell about your work. I'll start......

 

Let's see... First, I worked in the oilfield for for about fifteen years. I started on an offshore drilling rig, didn't like it and started training to run machines instead. Eventually I ended up being a machinist. I did that for about ten years or so until the industry started drying up around where I live. Well that and I got tired of the oilfield and have been looking for something more the last decade. About three years ago I decided to finally attend college and that is where I'm at now.

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My main job is in the welding business, a craft that I've been a part of for well over seven years. It's a difficult yet rewarding job, and yes it can be dangerous if one isn't careful. I've created many projects over the years, including handmade swords, jewellery, ironworks, cosplay props, and so much more, all of which I am quite proud of. The pay is great, the work is challenging, and the people I work with are like family to me. My sidejob, however, is a different story: I'm a slut on the side, but nobody wants to hear about that lmao ❤️

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12 minutes ago, Dakuryon said:

My main job is in the welding business

Sounds like a cool job making what you do. I've done some welding myself, but it was always to repair a part I was working on or something. I'd like to find a welder to have at home, but they tend to be expensive.

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2 hours ago, KoolHndLuke said:

That one question has sparked off some hours long dialogue (monologue) at times. Probably because people like to talk about what they do for a living. With this I'll add in that it is also of interest to me that you are all perverted gamers as well- like me! I'm not asking for any personal info here at all. Just what you would like to tell about your work. I'll start......

 

Let's see... First, I worked in the oilfield for for about fifteen years. I started on an offshore drilling rig, didn't like it and started training to run machines instead. Eventually I ended up being a machinist. I did that for about ten years or so until the industry started drying up around where I live. Well that and I got tired of the oilfield and have been looking for something more the last decade. About three years ago I decided to finally attend college and that is where I'm at now.

Writers block:

videomoviespeechcoolhandluke2.jpg.7b8bedd8b6e0d70c3c77dd99a5f0a242.jpg

 

As a well-dressed file clerk where the fucking Walls were well-dressed, I learned a little about BDSM and how evil evil women could be.

But "Peaches" was nice to me, although she'd get PO'd if I got the name of her town wrong ("snooty", not "snotty")

Food service was a real drag, women ordered me around, banged against my hips to get me to go faster,

and I learned how much I did not like Nylon Stockings.

The telephone company had lotsa women, lotsa feminine products I needed to pick up after.

Again, why the fetish?

They're used, and red, and they smell slightly of industrial perfume.

Delivery: Women teachers would berate me in front of giggling teens filled with scorn.

Fuck you, lady, I hope you died.

 

ahh, hmm girls started to care less for me as I moved into electronics and a nice apartment.

O sure, they'd stop by, but the lack of any decent furniture and the funny smells sort of turned them off.

They're old and fat now, living in their dead-parents' houses.

I could never have measured up.

Moved to "shanty town", no girls (OK the few married ones I got in dutch for)

 

Got ripped off, despised, so I sued.

I learned trendy is way more valued than performance. Dress well, and you'll go far, and I didn't dress well at all.

I learned how to build computers, but doing anything meaningful with them was beyond me.

$700 EGA monitors that made me so proud, then VGA came along and I lost interest.

I'll still fix your computer for smokes.

 

 

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15 minutes ago, 2dk2c.2 said:

I learned trendy is way more valued than performance.

That is quote worthy......and a truth about life I should have cared more for. To this day, I still ignore most trends and stick to what I like/know well. I reject trends on the basis of I don't have enough money to be posh or "trendy". :classic_biggrin:

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When I was younger if you told me something was trendy I would have run a mile rather than get involved in it.  Army surplus, leather jacket and a sullen expression was about my style.

 

What do I do for a living now, - sleep mostly.  Before I had to take early retirement due to illness I was a social worker which is a profession where everybody ignores you until their life starts falling apart.  I worked for the adult mental health service in triage so I mostly spent all day talking to suicidal people.  Sort of gets to you after a while if you're not careful.

 

Welding was mentioned, - my Dad taught me how to do that when I was young.  The last car I owned before I had to give up driving due to this illness I have I restored from the ground up.  Girls can do anything and all that.

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3 hours ago, foreversleep said:

What do I do for a living now, - sleep mostly.  Before I had to take early retirement due to illness I was a social worker which is a profession where everybody ignores you until their life starts falling apart.  I worked for the adult mental health service in triage so I mostly spent all day talking to suicidal people.  Sort of gets to you after a while if you're not careful.

 I imagine that was probably a pretty stressful job if you couldn't stay emotionally disconnected. Are there any common characteristics or backgrounds in people with suicidal tendencies you think? Just curious since I have dealt with some suicidal people before.

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1 minute ago, KoolHndLuke said:

 I imagine that was probably a pretty stressful job if you couldn't stay emotionally disconnected. Are there any common characteristics or backgrounds in people with suicidal tendencies you think? Just curious since I have dealt with some suicidal people before.

Either a not particularly good life situation that's becoming increasingly intolerable OR a totally sudden change in life circumstances that's for the worst seemed to be the two most common reasons for people wanting to take their own lives.

With people who have a mental illness though it can be a bit more complex as to why they want to die.  Often it's the first case of the intolerable life situation, but I can remember helping out with a suicide watch on a mentally ill woman who wanted to kill herself and there really did not seem to be any clear reason why she wanted to die.  In the end she managed to hang herself, but fortunately not while I was assigned to watch her.  Several of the clinic staff myself included went to her funeral and we really were devastated and upset over her death because of the effort we'd put into trying to convince her to chose to live instead. 

 

Yeah it did get pretty stressful at times.  I can remember after one long and difficult phone call I had to go outside and walk around for a while.  There was a smoking ban at the clinic, but I didn't care and I chain smoked three cigarettes before going back inside.  If anyone had told me off for smoking I would told them what exactly they could go and do with themselves, but fortunately nobody did.

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I'm a caregiver for my 86 year old Pop. It's not a "living," precisely. But it needs to be done.

 

I've worked previously in food service, auto insurance, wholesale livestock, home entertainment, FDA compliance... to name a few. I've been around.

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I studied music for 8 years, eventually teaching composing and conducting at music academy. Then when I was done with having no money I took my hobby (computers and programming) and made it my job. I specialize in optimizing medical software and equipment with the purpose of making it cheaper. I decided I wanted to add something to the world, after a long career in IT for commercial companies. I work in a hospital as IT manager and 'database person' and with a group of colleagues we work on optimizing software for older hardware in our spare time so we can help hospitals that can't afford the more expensive equipment by offering them features not normally present in their current hardware.

 

Before that I worked as a music professor (I taught in the academy) and in game design and IT.

As hobbies I still do game design and write classical- and ambient music.

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On 7/16/2019 at 6:07 PM, KoolHndLuke said:

...tell about your work...

After high school I went straight to man's world as a helper at Big Brown.  Those rednecks kicked my ass but I learned a lot and worked my way up to fitter and then Maintenance Manager; doing all of the iron work on structures and conveyor belts.  Worked for HL&P for 15 yrs and when the company split in 2003 I took early retirement.  Used that money to partner into a contracting company for Expro.  I worked on engineering my own high capacity nozzles for oilfield compressors and thermal pump units and in 2010 I was granted two hardware patents and 5 process patents.  I sold my interest in the contracting business and partnered with a new company.  Been there since.

We have our own fab shop now, 40 employees, blah-blah-blah.  My compressor technology is on oil rigs all over the planet; from China to the North Sea, Ivory Coast, Nigeria, Peru, Chile, Mexico, etc.  Most of the licensing is in Texas for the Midland and Delaware basins.  These days I loaf around and live off the licensing fees.  I only have to 'work' one or two days a week in the shop; welding inspector, project scheduling, and blue print approval.  Mostly I sit on my ass.

 

The year I spent in college was wasted money and time.  Everything I know is self-taught or through practical experience.

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For the last 10 years I have been a Computer Technician ( basically fix and troubleshoot computer related issues).

I started out doing almost seven years in the US military (enlisted), my time in the military I held 2 specialties.

My first specialty was Armored Reconnaissance Specialist. The second specialty was Multichannel Transmissions Operator / Maintainer.

After my time in the service, I worked as a Field Technician for Cricket Communications, did this for 5 years.

While working at Cricket I started doing a lot of self training in how to repair, troubleshoot and use computer systems. I had started this training while in the service.

I used my GI-Bill to go to college at a tech school with the thought I wanted to be a programmer.

I got an Associates Degree in Computer Science, (Programming).

That leads me to my current state.

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I jerk off for a living. Cause i'm a horny bastard! lol

 

 

Accounting for a business hold near me. Along with incremental investments on other small businesses in the area, i'm focusing on gaining more practical experience before getting into index funds/stocks and such. I can't do accounting for a conventional firm because i dropped out of college and don't have the degree because i couldn't afford the money or time at that point, but the private hold i work in lets me do his accounting because he knows i studied all the material at home anyway and have the experience, plus him and our family go way back so that's neat.

 

In general, nothing solid in the traditional sense, like medicine or engineering or software development or anything like that. But in the sense of making a decent living and incrementally raising the bar, i'd say it's decently solid.

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Hmm lets see first i studied for carpenter, i have slight 3 dimensional perception disorder so working long time wasnt really option for me in that profession. After army i pondered 2 years before considered doing jobs as substitute instructor, it taked 3 years and i was hmm 26 when graduating. I havent regret a day in that work, every day basicly was fresh adventure and working with pre schoolers is profession i am natural it seems. I do sometime Daycare home substitute jobs as well and i can say working wit 0-4 years old is challengin but rewarding at sametime 

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On 9/22/2019 at 5:32 AM, ramrod126 said:

Warehouse/forklift driver for a pet food company.

I've done that! For a different sort of company.

 

We had rows of stacks, 3 or 4 high. I learned how to operate a reach fork.

 

 

Yeah yeah, corporate video. But I can do this shit. :)

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I've spent the last 8.5 years putting miniature straw and hay bales into plastic bags. The farmer I work for sells them to pet shops and pet store wholesalers all over the east coast of Australia. I usually only get maybe 15 hours work a week, but top up with unemployment benefits. I've basically been unemployed and under-employed for 11 years. I am autistic.

 

In my previous life (before unemployment) I worked in the public service for 22 years, almost all of that at the department responsible for drivers licencing and vehicle registration (American's call it DMV). That job, my primary tasks were conducting driving tests for learner drivers, motorcycle licences and heavy truck licences. It was mostly "fun", some days more "fun" than others.  I've had supposedly competent middle aged drivers (applying for a tour bus drivers licence) pull out in front of a 150 tonne 50 metre long road train (Prime mover with 3 dog trailers) and then wonder why the fuck I shouted at them and inst-failed them.

I also was responsible for the issuing of taxi and school bus licences, you would be shocked at the number of convicted rapists that apply for those licences.

That career came to an end when I was fucked over by a supervisor and manager (women can be cunts) who put me through a corruption inquiry - and inquiry I walked away from fully exonerated. I resigned immediately after. They owed me so much accrued holiday pay that it broke their annual budget (and it was only 3 weeks into the financial year) - fuck them.

 

 

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On 9/26/2019 at 5:16 AM, Pork Type said:

I've done that! For a different sort of company.

 

We had rows of stacks, 3 or 4 high. I learned how to operate a reach fork.

 

 

Yeah yeah, corporate video. But I can do this shit. :)


 

 

I've done that too, at a CVS warehouse.

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It may sound pithy, but I live life for a living.

 

Occupationally, I have done a great many things for a great many reasons.

  1. For 5 years I was a professional bank robber and did quite well. (this was in my teens)
  2. For the following 20 years I was a Federal Prisoner - that was not nearly as fun, but I survived.
  3. I went to culinary arts school for 3 years and worked as a chef in a few places. After a couple of years, I came to the realization that unless I owned the place or somehow got onto Food Network, there would never be any money in my future, so I moved on.
  4. Worked for EQT on fracksites and water treatment for 3 years before being hired by Antero Resources. There I spent the next 6 years working 72 hr/week and making hand over fist in cash. After I realized that life was more important than profit, I left.
  5. Started a one-man game development/design company. Taught myself Maya, 3DsMax, Unreal 4, C++, and all the associated software that was needed. Not an expert in any of them, but was able to teach myself what I needed to know to move forward. Over the next year, got a decent amount completed and prepped for release on XBox live and Steam. When it came to optimization and reaching the finish line, I truly needed a handful of people that really knew what they were doing to complete it.
  6. Went back to 1099 work for the oilfield as an ESSC - Environmental Site-Safety Coordinator. Basically, ensuring that paperwork was filled out properly. I lost several IQ points doing this work. After one particular contract was fulfilled, I left.
  7. Professional father for the next few years. That and a member of the 501st legion, traveling around and making people happy.
  8. Opened a retail business selling Tactical/Survival/Camping gear to first responders, preppers, and outdoor enthusiasts. Closed it 18 months later as the economy turned sour and it began to lose money.
  9. Who knows what is next?
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