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Mod Review Criteria


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6 replies to this topic

#1
Manax

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I am working on a project, and I am curious to see what you think the criteria would be to measure a modification.  I have listed a few, but would really like some input:

 

Gameplay - The mod is fluid and works well with the current game

Quality - The mod is visually appealing

Immersion - Thomas the Tank Engine in Skyrim may get low marks here

 

These are just ideas so I'd like to hear more!!

 

 


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#2
Wolborg

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One thing that is important as well is the lack of hidden effects. I mean, the author shouldn't make a script run every 3 seconds without telling about it in the description. Or, for instance, a mod that creates an island outside of the Skyrim province has no business changing the shape of the Iron Sword without any warning in the mod description. Or a mod that claims to affect only Solitude shouldn't alter a door in Riverwood.

 


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#3
Content Consumer

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Mechanical complexity is something very few reviews take into account. This is completely understandable - most people don't know how much work goes into making some kinds of mods. Even those equipped to judge are usually too specialized to do so - for example, I can look at a mod and say "boy, that's an intricate set of scripts right there!" but I have no idea if a mesh took 30 seconds or 30 days to make up.

And really it doesn't matter to the end user anyway. Just a pet peeve of mine. ;)

 

Anyway, something to note would be the impact the mod has on the engine. Does it make the game a little less stable? More stable? Is it compatible with few, some, many, or most other mods?

 

Are you measuring mods relative to other mods? Or just based on subjective analysis? And are you going to give ratings, and if so, what kind of rating (3/5, 72/100, bad-okay-good, etcetera)?

 

And... what sort of project is it? Are you starting up a website where you review mods, or a blog here on LL, or something else?

 

EDIT: And for which game? :)


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#4
arpaschad

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lady Aribeth de tylmarande...I miss Neverwinter Nights...if only someone would make a mod for skyrim using D&D stories...

 

that aside, I guess the things you should be looking for in reviewing a mod are

 

stability- how does it play on its own or with other mods

gameplay- how smoothly it runs and delivers it's goods

entertainment and /or replayability- if it is a quest mod or something that delivers a story would it reel you in the story or will it turn out to be one garbage in a plethora of garbage mods? would you want to play it agian? or use it's functions again...


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#5
Manax

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Thanks for the input...Stability was a criteria i kept skirting around. 

 

To answer Content Consumer, the project I am working on is a site that will allow members to rate and review all kinds of things, but mods will be part of it. 

 

The main aspect of the site is an actual project management system that will allow members to collaborate on lots of different projects...not just game mods.  They can then publish their creations here or there or anywhere that hosts such files.

 

I am open to all other suggestions, so keep them coming!


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#6
Bindair Dundat

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Innovation - How unique its idea is. (If it does something I've seen other mods do before, I won't even consider trying it unless it gets serious attention within weeks.)

 

Requirements - How many other mods it needs to work. (If too many, I simply won't try it. Too high chance of something going wrong.)

 

Compatibility - How the mod works with other popular mods. (We all have "musthave" mods. If it conflicts with any of those, then it's a bye-bye.)

 

Size - How big the mod actually is. (No explanation necessary.)

 

Performance - How the game runs with it. (If it slows my game, it's a bye-bye.)

 

Customization - How well can the mod be customized through the mod menu to fit different playstyles/players.

 

And most important:

Description - How good does the description tell what the mod actually does. (I don't even bother with mods without descriptions.)


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#7
RapidWaterOver

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One thing that is important as well is the lack of hidden effects. I mean, the author shouldn't make a script run every 3 seconds without telling about it in the description. Or, for instance, a mod that creates an island outside of the Skyrim province has no business changing the shape of the Iron Sword without any warning in the mod description. Or a mod that claims to affect only Solitude shouldn't alter a door in Riverwood.

Scripts effect on game performance is minimal unless you're running a literal toaster. The other things sound like they're just dirty edits that were unknowingly made by the mod author, and are really easy to clean up yourself anyway.


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